America’s Premier Kitchen Remodeling Franchise

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“Kitchen Solvers manages the website for me. We have a Facebook page. This is the stuff that I really don’t want to manage — it’s just not me. Kitchen Solvers helps manage those ancillaries. As a small business owner, you choose the hats you want to wear. You’re going to wear a lot of them, but you can also delegate the ones you’re not comfortable wearing. If the franchisor can pull some of those hats off for you, there is value. One thing I’ve always respected is that whenever I’ve needed something — I still need favors and help with things — they’ve never let me down. All you need to do is ask.”

— Art Mancino, who has owned the franchise in Roswell, Ga., since 2003.

“I have customers I did work for 13 years ago who come to my home show and praise me up and down. I’ve got a lot of customers like that. I can’t count them on both hands. You’re not going to please everybody in this life, but 99 percent of my customers are totally happy with what we did. I get a lot of satisfaction that I’ve made people happy and they will refer us because it’s been a good experience. The satisfaction you get when you see what you can do — that’s important.”

— Gary Schmidt, who has owned the franchise in Marion, Iowa, since 1997.

“I wanted to get out of the full-blown wide range of remodeling and get into something narrower and more focused. Kitchens are one room, and they go comparatively fast compared to a three- to six-month renovation/addition. I can train pretty much anyone to do a reface, unless you’re all thumbs. That doesn’t apply to other aspects of remodeling. … They have their own business operating system. If you’re new, they train you. If you’re already in business, they still help you because it gives you a framework to operate your business. They have sales tools. I get access to products and services that I wouldn’t otherwise get at the same price point because of the buying factor of going through a franchise. A franchise is also more saleable. Kitchen Solvers has a history of franchisees being able to sell their franchise. If you’re AAA remodeling or Bob’s Remodeling, that makes it harder to sell your business. With a franchise, you have verifiable financial information that a buyer can look at when they consider buying your business.”

— Larry Schaffert, who owns the franchise in Frederick, Maryland, which he runs as a division of Schaffert Construction, a company that he founded in 1989, nine years before he joined Kitchen Solvers. “If I had it to do all over again, getting into construction, I would do it as part of a franchise because it gives you a jump start. I would start with Kitchen Solvers.”

“I use WalzCraft materials, which others cannot use because they can’t afford it. One nice thing is we can get some products for less money thanks to Kitchen Solvers. If you focus on your main vendors, you can increase your buying power. If you and 80 people go into WalzCraft, they give you discounts. We get some great discounts. … The folks in La Crosse are great, too. … I wound up fifth in nation in sales and had 153 percent revenue growth last year and I think a lot of it is because I asked for help. Gerry and Bill — they’ve just been a lot of help. Trey, too — they’re there for people to use them as a resource. ‘Hey, Bill, I need a sales sheet for this home show coming up. I want to offer a bathroom vanity with a kitchen remodel.’ Boom, it’s done. ‘Hey, Trey, I need a program loaded onto another computer.’ He does it. Gerry, with his platinum sales training and the ongoing coaching we get from that. Say I have a challenge with a client in terms of trying to close a sale. I call Gerry and we talk about it. I’m constantly in touch with them on this stuff. They’re a heck of a resource.”

— Dechert Sharpell, who bought his franchise in Kansas City in 2008.

“I’m selling a dream for some of these people who’ve always wanted a new kitchen that they’ve never had. You can tell they have a passion for the kitchen project and it’s fun to be involved in that. “What do you like about your kitchen? What don’t you like? What would you change?” To listen and be able to have the product to turn those thoughts into reality — it’s something that I enjoy. I’ve had a tremendous start. I went to three home shows this spring. The first one I left with 44 appointments, which was almost too much. The next I left with 22 appointments, then the next got me 22 more.”

— John Andreas, who bought his franchise in Greer, S.C., in January.

“Franchises help each other out. I have had two new franchises call me, and I’m happy to talk to them. There are a lot of people to share ideas with. And there is a yearly convention. That was huge. These people are very passionate about their business. I see that passion and I want to share in that success.”

— Sara Baumann, who bought the franchise in Eau Claire, Wisc., in the summer of 2011.